Franciso Pérez de Antón during the conference.

The changes that he has seen since he came to Guatemala were the subject of the conference that Francisco Perez de Antón lectured at the Milton Friedman Auditorium of Universidad Francisco Marroquín last January 17th, 2007.

“This last 30 years have been a very important part of Guatemala’s history and, for many of us it has been, perhaps, the most crucial part of our existence”, said Perez de Antón at the beginning of his lecture.

In order to define where we are and how we have arrived here, Perez de Antón said that Guatemala’s history can be written throughout its revolutions: the revolution in the 10th Century when a group of tribes, coming from the Gulf of Mexico conquered the Guatemalan plateau; the second one, took place in Iximché in 1423 due to territorial differences; the third one was when the troops of Alvarado arrived; the fourth, was the one of Christianity and mestization; the fifth was the Independence; the sixth one was in 1871; the seventh was in 1944; and the eighth was in 1996 with the signature of the peace treaty.  Today we lived with the sequels of another revolution: the democratic revolution that implies certain market economy and political freedom.

Perez de Antón also talked about the 30 years that were the subject of his lecture, and then he made an analysis of the 10 most important changes that, in his opinion, the country has had in these three decades and that have made it almost unrecognizable.  Please, view the complete conference,
here.

The writer and industrial Francisco Perez de Antón has an honoris causa doctoral degree from Universidad Francisco Marroquín and he was the first graduated from its School of Businesses.  He also received, from the Law School of this house of studies, recognition to the National Author, in 2005.

Perez de Antón is author of  La Guerra de los capinegrosLos hijos del incienso y de la pólovora, El gato y la sacristía and La libre empresa, among other works of literary, journalistic and academic character.  Recently he wrote

Edmundo Nanne, president of the British-Guatemalan Cultural Foundation, introduced the lecturer; and Giancarlo Ibárgüen S., UFM President, began the act and celebrated that the Foundation had organized the conference in this house of studies.

More photos,
here