Fritz Thomas at UFM’s Friedrich A. Hayek Auditorium

As part of the series of conferences organized by the Social Philosophy Class professor Fritz Thomas gave a lecture on The Cost of Governance.

The same one was about what do people get in return of having a government; and he questioned the premises of what should we do for the government, an why should we invest more in it.  He questioned the effective contribution of government on economic growth and the ways of measuring government exercise.  His doctoral thesis on this subject can be seen
here.

As a curious note, Thomas quoted Proudhon: “To be governed means to be inspected, spied, directed, legislated, regulated, tagged, lectured, prosecuted, appreciated, censored, ruled by beings that have no title, science or virtue.”

Being governed means that, with motive of every operation, of each transaction, we are being noted, registered, censed, billed, budgeted, patented, licensed, authorized, contained, reformed, emended and detained.

Under the pretext of public utility and in name of general interest, we are being exposed to contribution, exercise, exploitation, monopolization, predation, mystification, robbery, then, at the minor sense of resistance, at the minor word of protest, repressed, billed, accused, mistreated, beaten, disarmed, imprisoned, shot, judged, condemned, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed and on top of everything, laughed at, ridiculed, outraged and dishonored.  Here is the government, its master, its morality, here is your justice!

Fritz Thomas is Doctor in Economics and was dean of the Economic Sciences School of the Francisco Marroquín University.  The Social Philosophy Class, that is part of the UFM’s Henry Hazlitt Center, is directed by Julio César De León Barbero.  The lecture was held last Tuesday, April 25th 2006 to all the Hayek’s Social Philosophy students.

In this series of conferences have participated Maite Rico and Bertrand de la Grange, authors of the book ¿Quíen mató al Obispo?  José Eduardo Valdizán, attorney and journalist; Warren Orbaugh, architect and professor of Architectural Theory; Roberto Blum, director of the David Hume Ethics Center; Carlos Sabino, on the October Revolution in Guatemala; and Marta Yolanda Díaz-Durán, Jorge Jacobs and Luis Figueroa, on journalism, among others.

More photos,
here.