Acton said: “Everyones will cannot make right what´s not fair”

Who has not heard the celebrate phrase that says: “the power tends to corrupt, and the absolute power corrupts absolutly”?  Its author is Lord John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton, first Acton baron from Aldenham.

Lord Acton, was born in Naples, Italy, on January 10th, 1834, son of sir Richard Acton and countess Marie Luise de Dalberg.

Acton studied in the Munich University and was student of the historian Ignaz von Döllinger.  By means of its lessons, Acton learned to consider himself, mainly, as an historian.  Since his early formation he cultivated great admiration for Whigs politicians like Edmund Burke and throughout his studies and experience he understood the dangers that any class of political or religious persecution meant for the individual conscience.

In 1859 he entered the House of Commons and in 1869 prime minister William Gladstone rewarded his efforts in favor of the liberal cause and named him “Par del reino”.

Years before, Acton already published the Rambler, a catholic newspaper dedicated to the discussion of political  social and theologic ideas.  By means of his participation in the first Vatican Concile, Acton was known as one of the most articulated defensors of political and religious liberties. He argued that the Church fulfills its mission faithfully when it supports the persecution of the scientific, historical and philosophical truth, and when it promotes the individual freedom in the religious field.

In 1895 he was named Regius Professor of Modern History at the Cambridge University.  Although he never concluded his universal history, when he died in 1902 he was considered one of the most knowledgable persons or the era.

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